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Elwha Dam (former) on the lower Elwha River, WA

#ThisIsClimateChange Dams contribute to climate change, as explained in this Washington State University press release: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-08/wsu-ang080612.php. Basically, aside from the carbon emissions from dam construction, there is an initial "carbon pulse" from filling a dam, when the impoundment area's plant life is engulfed and decomposes, and then there is an ongoing emission of methane that is developed within the reservoir, as carbon dioxide is converted by plants and decomposed in the water column. This methane is released by changing water levels as the reservoir is managed for energy production.

This dam is the Elwha Dam. Rather, it *was* the Elwha Dam. The Elwha River now flows freely through the reservoir area and former dam site, taking decades of built-up sediment downstream with it. That sediment has reconstructed the Elwha estuary into the Straight of Juan de Fuca, bordering with Canada to the north. The river itself is undergoing restoration efforts by the Park Service: https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/elwha-ecosystem-restoration.htm.

National Geographic has a great news article on the demolition of this and the upper, larger, Glines Canyon Dam: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/08/140826-elwha-river-dam-removal-salmon-science-olympic/.

This is a great time-lapse video of both dams being de-constructed: https://youtu.be/m96VcCF4Ess.

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Filename
002_9101.jpg
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Climate Photography
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Lower Elwha River Dam Post-Decommission
#ThisIsClimateChange Dams contribute to climate change, as explained in this Washington State University press release: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-08/wsu-ang080612.php. Basically, aside from the carbon emissions from dam construction, there is an initial "carbon pulse" from filling a dam, when the impoundment area's plant life is engulfed and decomposes, and then there is an ongoing emission of methane that is developed within the reservoir, as carbon dioxide is converted by plants and decomposed in the water column. This methane is released by changing water levels as the reservoir is managed for energy production.<br />
<br />
This dam is the Elwha Dam.  Rather, it *was*  the Elwha Dam.  The Elwha River now flows freely through the reservoir area and former dam site, taking decades of built-up sediment downstream with it.  That sediment has reconstructed the Elwha estuary into the Straight  of Juan de Fuca, bordering with Canada to the north.  The river itself is undergoing restoration efforts by the Park Service: https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/elwha-ecosystem-restoration.htm.<br />
<br />
National Geographic has a great news article on the demolition of this and the upper, larger, Glines Canyon Dam: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/08/140826-elwha-river-dam-removal-salmon-science-olympic/.<br />
<br />
This is a great time-lapse video of both dams being de-constructed: https://youtu.be/m96VcCF4Ess.