Image 1 of 1

002_5342.jpg

Add to Cart Add to Lightbox Download
#SignOfClimateProgress

The Salton Sea, a manmade accident by a Colorado River canal failure, has developed into a critical habitat for migrating birds, as well as an economic staple for the surrounding communities.

However, in more recent times, the sea is receding due to less runoff from surrounding agricultural operations, and the sea is becoming an air pollution liability, from strong winds (illustrated within these images), and toxic dust from the lake bed. But this is just a fragment of the story. To better tell the several angles and storylines, see:

Restoration, LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-salton-sea-project-20151108-story.html

Restoration and new geothermal, Desert Sun: http://www.desertsun.com/story/tech/science/energy/2016/03/15/salton-sea-could-get-new-geothermal-power-plant/81839422/, and Audubon: http://ca.audubon.org/news/what-geothermal-power-and-how-might-it-save-salton-sea

New geothermal, Desert Sun: http://www.desertsun.com/story/tech/science/energy/2016/05/05/salton-sea-dreaming-big-geothermal/83845318/

How times have changed, Audubon: http://ca.audubon.org/node/25351.

Toxic dust, The Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2015/11/the-airborne-toxic-lake-event/414888/

Saving water, National Geographic: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/02/140218-salton-sea-imperial-valley-qsa-water-conservation/

What the future holds, LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/science/la-me-salton-sea-20151001-story.html

From geothermal activity (natural and manmade), to dust, to water receded shorelines, this gallery's images attempt to capture these stories.
Copyright
Climate Photography, Joshua Ruschhaupt
Image Size
7360x4912 / 4.5MB
Contained in galleries
Salton Sea and Geothermal
#SignOfClimateProgress<br />
<br />
The Salton Sea, a manmade accident by a Colorado River canal failure, has developed into a critical habitat for migrating birds, as well as an economic staple for the surrounding communities.  <br />
<br />
However, in more recent times, the sea is receding due to less runoff from surrounding agricultural operations, and the sea is becoming an air pollution liability, from strong winds (illustrated within these images), and toxic dust from the lake bed.  But this is just a fragment of the story.  To better tell the several angles and storylines, see: <br />
<br />
Restoration, LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-salton-sea-project-20151108-story.html<br />
<br />
Restoration and new geothermal, Desert Sun: http://www.desertsun.com/story/tech/science/energy/2016/03/15/salton-sea-could-get-new-geothermal-power-plant/81839422/, and Audubon: http://ca.audubon.org/news/what-geothermal-power-and-how-might-it-save-salton-sea<br />
<br />
New geothermal, Desert Sun: http://www.desertsun.com/story/tech/science/energy/2016/05/05/salton-sea-dreaming-big-geothermal/83845318/<br />
<br />
How times have changed, Audubon: http://ca.audubon.org/node/25351.<br />
<br />
Toxic dust, The Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2015/11/the-airborne-toxic-lake-event/414888/<br />
<br />
Saving water, National Geographic: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/02/140218-salton-sea-imperial-valley-qsa-water-conservation/<br />
<br />
What the future holds, LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/science/la-me-salton-sea-20151001-story.html<br />
<br />
From geothermal activity (natural and manmade), to dust, to water receded shorelines, this gallery's images attempt to capture these stories.